Income from blogs, vlogs and social media platforms

The Finnish tax legislation does not have any special provisions on social media income. Any income from social media is taxed in accordance with the general principles. All income that you earn in the form of money or benefits is considered taxable income. You can also deduct the expenses related to the production of income.

Please note that you can only deduct those expenses that are directly related to the production of income and only for the part that they have been used in the production of income.

As a social media influencer, you may have an employment contract with a company that pays you wages for acting as an influencer. You may also receive other types of earned income, such as trade income. A social media influencer can also be an entrepreneur, in which case the income is considered business income.

The following are also considered taxable income:

  • cash payments in exchange for writing or product sales
  • various goods and benefits
  • discounts
  • gift cards
  • trips 
  • admission tickets.

See the instructions on what to do if you receive income from streaming or fundraising campaigns

Check your pre-completed tax return

If the company has not filed the income paid to you, you must file it by supplementing your pre-completed tax return.

File in MyTax

Remember to keep notes of your income and the expenses related to it. Do not enclose receipts with your tax return.

How to file in MyTax:

  • Report your income and expenses under Other income in the Production of income section.
  • If you had an employment contract with the payor, report the income under Wages, salaries, fees and compensation. Report the expenses that relate to wage income under the section Production of income - Expenses incurred in acquiring or maintaining wage income.
  • If you have received income from sources outside Finland, report the income and deductions from it under Foreign income -  Foreign earned income

How to file on paper forms

Use the correct form:

Compensation received as something other than money

Compensation that you have received in forms other than money must be valuated at its fair market value. Ordinary promotional gifts are not treated as taxable income. Such products include promotional gifts and goods bearing an advertiser’s logo that cannot easily be converted into money.  However, if there has been an agreement that the promotional gift is the compensation paid to you for advertisement on social media, the gift's fair market value is taxable income.

Example: You have made a contract with a company to advertise their product on social media for a specified period of time. After this, you are given the product as a result of the collaboration. No other compensation has been agreed on. The fair value of the product is €1,000.
The income is taxable and it is valuated at the fair market value, i.e. €1,000. Check your pre-completed tax return. If the company has not reported the income, report it yourself by adding it to your pre-completed tax return.

Example: A company sends you a product as a gift on its own initiative. The product is worth €300. The company hopes that the product will get visibility on your platform. You have no obligation to use or send back the product. You keep the product but do not advertise it or use it in any way on your social media platforms.
The income is taxable and it is valuated at the fair market value, i.e. €300. Check your pre-completed tax return. If the company has not reported the income, report it yourself by adding it to your pre-completed tax return.

Do you operate a business?

If your income from social media is part of your business operations, file the income and expenses on the business tax return. If your turnover exceeds €15,000 in an accounting period, you must also register for VAT.

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Frequently asked questions

Whether the parties have agreed on sending the gift is irrelevant.

The gift is taxable income for the recipient, and the value of the gift is its fair market value at the time of receiving it.

Promotional gifts of low value are an exception, such as products that bear the logo of an advertiser.

Remember to check on your pre-completed tax return whether the company has already reported the value of the product as your income. If not, add the income yourself.

Report the value of the ticket as income on your tax return. The value of a product is its fair market value at the time of receiving the product.

Yes. A free service, such as a free night stay, is taxable income. The taxable value of the service is its fair market value at the time of receiving the service.

Remember to check on your pre-completed tax return whether the company has already reported the value of the product as your income. If not, add the income yourself.